Religion and Burial Rituals
/1st 4th Century/
hall 10
 
In the early 1st century AD Odessos was included into the realms of the Roman Empire. The town and the surrounding region were influenced by a variety of cultural tendencies. The population was ethnically varied which explains the variety in the deity pantheon during that epoch. The supreme god of Odessos was the Thracian god Darzalas but most widely spread among the local population was the cult to Heros, the Thracian god-horseman.
 The earliest votive tablets dedicated to the Thracian god-horseman have been discovered in a big sanctuary from the 2nd century AD near the Galata residential quarters by Varna. /Hall 10A/
 
 The marble votive tablets and altars from Odessos and its surroundings were dedicated to Greek, Roman, Eastern and local deities such as Dionisius, Zeus, Hera, Nemesis, Athens, Mars, Mitra and others. /Hall 10/
 In the region are discovered also sanctuaries testifying to other honored deities Asclepius, Hygia, Telesphorus, the three nymphs, the local deity Suregetes /Hall 12A/. Statues of Heracles, Nike, Jupiter-Dolihenus, Hermes confirm their popularity especially among the citizens of the town. /Hall 11/.
 The belief in the other life determined the rituals in attendance on the dead. Part of the big collection of tombstones exhibited in Hall 11 gives an idea about the burial rituals during the Roman age. 
Most of these tombstones have been worked out in the workshops of Odessos. Among the scenes depicted on the tombstones prevailing is the one known as "Funeral Feast". The inscriptions on the stones give evidence to the ethnic structure of the population mainly Greeks and Thracians. Among them there are doctors, teachers, sailors and others.
 Numerous bronze, glass, and ceramic vessels, medical instruments and utensils have been found in the grave of a doctor priest in the nearby town of Dionisopolis /today's town of Baltchik/ - Hall 12

 
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